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Lachlan McGillivray, Indian trader : the shaping of the southern colonial frontier / Edward J. Cashin.

By: Cashin, Edward J, 1927-2007.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1992Description: x, 405 p. : maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0820313688.Subject(s): McGillivray, Lachlan | Pioneers -- Georgia -- Biography | Georgia -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 | Indians of North America -- Georgia -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775DDC classification: 975.8/02/092 | B LOC classification: F289.M43 | C37 1992
Contents:
1. Strathnairn in Invernesshire -- 2. Forming a New Colony -- 3. The Clan Chattan Connection -- 4. Outpost of Empire -- 5. The Choctaw Revolt -- 6. The Powerful Company at Augusta -- 7. Intruders on the Ogeechee -- 8. The French and Indian War on the Southern Frontier -- 9. The Mission of Edmond Atkin -- 10. The Cherokee War -- 11. The War Winds Down -- 12. Reshaping the Frontier -- 13. The Aftermath of 1763 -- 14. A Savannah Gentleman -- 15. The Second Congress of Augusta, 1773 -- 16. Return to Strathnairn.
Summary: On the southern colonial frontier--the lands south of the Carolinas from the Savannah to the Mississippi rivers--Indian traders were an essential commercial and political link between Native Americans and European settlers. By following the career of one influential trader from 1736 to 1776, Edward J. Cashin presents a historical perspective of the frontier not as the edge of European civilization but as a zone of constant change and interaction between many cultures.Summary: Lachlan McGillivray knew firsthand of the frontier's natural wealth and strategic importance to England, France, and Spain, because he lived deep within it among his wife's people, the Creeks. Until he returned to his native Scotland in 1782, he witnessed; and often participated in the major events shaping the region--from decisive battles to major treaties and land cessions. He was both a consultant to the leaders of colonial Georgia and South Carolina and their emissary to the great chiefs of the Creeks, Cherokees, Choctaws, and Chickasaws. Cashin discusses the aims and ambitions of the frontier's many interest groups, profiles the figures who catalyzed the power struggles, and explains events from the vantage points of traders and Native Americans. He also offers information about the rise of the southern elite, for in the decade before he left America, McGillivray was a successful planter and slave trader, a popular politician, and a member of the Savannah gentry.Summary: Against the panorama of the southern frontier, Edward J. Cashin affirms the importance of traders in regional and international politics and commerce.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 373-389) and index.

1. Strathnairn in Invernesshire -- 2. Forming a New Colony -- 3. The Clan Chattan Connection -- 4. Outpost of Empire -- 5. The Choctaw Revolt -- 6. The Powerful Company at Augusta -- 7. Intruders on the Ogeechee -- 8. The French and Indian War on the Southern Frontier -- 9. The Mission of Edmond Atkin -- 10. The Cherokee War -- 11. The War Winds Down -- 12. Reshaping the Frontier -- 13. The Aftermath of 1763 -- 14. A Savannah Gentleman -- 15. The Second Congress of Augusta, 1773 -- 16. Return to Strathnairn.

On the southern colonial frontier--the lands south of the Carolinas from the Savannah to the Mississippi rivers--Indian traders were an essential commercial and political link between Native Americans and European settlers. By following the career of one influential trader from 1736 to 1776, Edward J. Cashin presents a historical perspective of the frontier not as the edge of European civilization but as a zone of constant change and interaction between many cultures.

Lachlan McGillivray knew firsthand of the frontier's natural wealth and strategic importance to England, France, and Spain, because he lived deep within it among his wife's people, the Creeks. Until he returned to his native Scotland in 1782, he witnessed; and often participated in the major events shaping the region--from decisive battles to major treaties and land cessions. He was both a consultant to the leaders of colonial Georgia and South Carolina and their emissary to the great chiefs of the Creeks, Cherokees, Choctaws, and Chickasaws. Cashin discusses the aims and ambitions of the frontier's many interest groups, profiles the figures who catalyzed the power struggles, and explains events from the vantage points of traders and Native Americans. He also offers information about the rise of the southern elite, for in the decade before he left America, McGillivray was a successful planter and slave trader, a popular politician, and a member of the Savannah gentry.

Against the panorama of the southern frontier, Edward J. Cashin affirms the importance of traders in regional and international politics and commerce.

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