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The Whydah : a pirate ship feared, wrecked, and found / Martin W. Sandler.

By: Sandler, Martin W [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: [Somerville, Massachusetts] : Candlewick Press, [2017]Copyright date: �2017Edition: First edition.Description: 170 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780763680336; 0763680338.Subject(s): Whidah (Ship) -- Juvenile literature | Whidah (Ship) | Pirates -- Caribbean Area -- History -- 18th century -- Juvenile literature | Buccaneers -- History -- 18th century -- Juvenile literature | Slave trade -- History -- 18th century -- Juvenile literature | Shipwrecks -- Massachusetts -- Cape Cod -- Juvenile literature | Pirates -- Caribbean Area -- History -- 18th century | Buccaneers -- History -- 18th century | Slave trade -- History -- 18th century | Shipwrecks -- Massachusetts -- Cape CodDDC classification: 910.4/5 LOC classification: F2161.5 | .S26 2017
Contents:
The slave ship Whydah -- A new pirate king -- Bigger ships, bigger prizes -- The pirate ship Whydah -- The Whydah rules the waves -- The wreck of the Whydah -- The survivors -- The adventures of Cyprian Southack -- Legends -- The search for the Whydah -- Victory at last -- What the artifacts tell us.
Awards: School Library Journal's Best Books, 2017 | NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children Recommended Book, 2018 | YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist, 2018Summary: Launched in 1716 to ply the Triangular Trade route, the Whydah was designed to be fast and to hold large amounts of cargo, both material and human. Captain Prince had completed the sale of slaves brought from Africa to the Caribbean and had turned the Whydah toward England laden with riches when his ship was overtaken by one of the most successful pirates of the time. Black Sam Bellamy sought not only fortune but a ship with a large capacity to carry it. He used the Whydah as his flagship and loaded it to the gunnels with loot from vessels plundered along the East Coast of America. But on a stormy night in 1717, the Whydah ran aground on a sandbar off Cape Cod and sank. Cape Codders salvaged what washed ashore. The governor of Massachusetts sent his best man to look for the rest -- but nothing could be found. It wasn't until 1984 that marine archaeologists found the wreck and its treasure of old and priceless artifacts, as well as a wealth of historical evidence that changed much of what we thought about pirates.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book Bailey Cove Branch
Juvenile non-fiction
Juvenile non-fiction J 910.45 SAN (Browse shelf) Available 31562016893614
Book Book Downtown Branch
Juvenile non-fiction
Juvenile non-fiction J 910.45 SAN (Browse shelf) Available 31562016893606
Book Book Downtown Branch
Ordered
Book Book Madison Branch
Juvenile non-fiction
Juvenile non-fiction J TRAN 910.45 SAN (Browse shelf) Available 31562016893598
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 165-166) and index.

The slave ship Whydah -- A new pirate king -- Bigger ships, bigger prizes -- The pirate ship Whydah -- The Whydah rules the waves -- The wreck of the Whydah -- The survivors -- The adventures of Cyprian Southack -- Legends -- The search for the Whydah -- Victory at last -- What the artifacts tell us.

Launched in 1716 to ply the Triangular Trade route, the Whydah was designed to be fast and to hold large amounts of cargo, both material and human. Captain Prince had completed the sale of slaves brought from Africa to the Caribbean and had turned the Whydah toward England laden with riches when his ship was overtaken by one of the most successful pirates of the time. Black Sam Bellamy sought not only fortune but a ship with a large capacity to carry it. He used the Whydah as his flagship and loaded it to the gunnels with loot from vessels plundered along the East Coast of America. But on a stormy night in 1717, the Whydah ran aground on a sandbar off Cape Cod and sank. Cape Codders salvaged what washed ashore. The governor of Massachusetts sent his best man to look for the rest -- but nothing could be found. It wasn't until 1984 that marine archaeologists found the wreck and its treasure of old and priceless artifacts, as well as a wealth of historical evidence that changed much of what we thought about pirates.

Ages 10-14.

1270L Lexile.

School Library Journal's Best Books, 2017

NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children Recommended Book, 2018

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist, 2018

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