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Kantha : recycled and embroidered textiles of Bengal.

Contributor(s): Sidner, Rob [contributor.] | McGowen, Courtenay C [contributor.] | Pal, Pratapaditya [contributor.] | Gillow, John [contributor.] | Radius Books [publisher.] | Mingei International Museum [publisher.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Santa Fe, NM : San Diego, CA : Radius Books ; Mingei International Museum, [2017]Distributor: New York, NY : Available through D.A.P. / Distributed Art Publishers, [date of distribution not identified]Copyright date: ©2017Description: 159 pages : color illustrations, maps ; 33 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1942185197; 9781942185192.Other title: Recycled and embroidered textiles of Bengal.Subject(s): Kanthas -- Pictorial works | Embroidery -- India -- Bengal | Embroidery | Kanthas | India -- BengalGenre/Form: Exhibition catalogs. | Photobooks. | Pictorial works. | Exhibition catalogs. | Photobooks.DDC classification: 746.440954/1
Contents:
Rob Sidner -- Courtenay C McGowen -- Embroidered Dreams: a personal appreciation / Pratapaditya Pal -- Kanthas: the pride of Bengal / John Gillow --
Summary: The part of Bengal where the Ganges River flows into the Bay of Bengal has historically been the source of the finest cotton ever produced. The kind of embroidery known as 'kantha' is created from this material, for daily use in many different contexts and in many different sizes. It deploys a simple running stitch in quilting layers of used cloth; details are embroidered using satin and stem stitches with thread taken from the colored borders of cast-off saris and dhotis. The workmanship varies from the crude to the complex and refined, but they are all made for daily use for various household purposes. The tribal culture of this region and its sense of continuity were evident until the early part of the 20th century, but the true unraveling of the 'kantha' tradition came with partition, followed by the devastation brought on by the mass exodus of Hindu and Muslim populations in Pakistan, East Pakistan and India. Now, with global warming, the rising waters are resulting in the disappearance of villages, along with the livelihoods of the inhabitants. Exhibition: Mingei International Museum, San Diego, United States (27.05.-31.12.2017).
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book Madison Branch
Adult non-fiction
Adult non-fiction CRAF 746.4409 KAN (Browse shelf) 1 Available 31562016607402
Total holds: 0

Published on the occasion of an exhibition at the Mingei International Museum, San Diego, October 28, 2017-March 25, 2018.

Texts by Rob Sidner, Courtenay McGowen, Pratapaditya Pal, and John Gillow.

Includes bibliographical references (page 151).

Foreword / Rob Sidner -- Preface / Courtenay C McGowen -- Embroidered Dreams: a personal appreciation / Pratapaditya Pal -- Plates -- Kanthas: the pride of Bengal / John Gillow -- Selected bibliography -- Maps -- Supporters of Mingei International Museum.

The part of Bengal where the Ganges River flows into the Bay of Bengal has historically been the source of the finest cotton ever produced. The kind of embroidery known as 'kantha' is created from this material, for daily use in many different contexts and in many different sizes. It deploys a simple running stitch in quilting layers of used cloth; details are embroidered using satin and stem stitches with thread taken from the colored borders of cast-off saris and dhotis. The workmanship varies from the crude to the complex and refined, but they are all made for daily use for various household purposes. The tribal culture of this region and its sense of continuity were evident until the early part of the 20th century, but the true unraveling of the 'kantha' tradition came with partition, followed by the devastation brought on by the mass exodus of Hindu and Muslim populations in Pakistan, East Pakistan and India. Now, with global warming, the rising waters are resulting in the disappearance of villages, along with the livelihoods of the inhabitants. Exhibition: Mingei International Museum, San Diego, United States (27.05.-31.12.2017).

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